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> Frequently Asked Questions

1. Why do I have to pay Association Fees and what do they cover?
2. What does the Association do?
3. What is a "managing agent" and what is their authority?
4. What are the Governing Documents?
5. Where can I get a copy of the Governing Documents?
6. What is a deed restriction and why do I have to comply?
7. Why do I have to get the Association's permission for home improvement?
8. What do the Association fees cover?
9. What is the "common area"?

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Q. Why do I have to pay Association Fees and what do they cover?
A. All owners are required to pay Association Fees by the governing documents of their Association. The fees may be due annually or monthly. They fund the operation and maintenance of the common property and are used to provide services for the benefit of all owners. Association Fees pay for common area landscape maintenance, repair and maintenance of pools, playgrounds and equipment, and they provide for improvements desired by the Association, and for services to the owners. Top

Q. What does the Association do?
A. The Association is a nonprofit corporation managed by a Board of Directors elected by the owners. The Board is responsible for the management of the Association's funds, the enforcement of the deed restrictions, and the maintenance of common area property. Top

Q. What is a "managing agent" and what is their authority?
A. The managing agent is a company that is engaged by the Board of Directors to provide guidance to the Board, and to implement the Board's decisions or instructions. Sterling ASI's sole business is serving Associations as Managing Agent. A managing agent has no authority except as conferred by the Board of Directors. A managing agent does not make decisions; it implements the decisions of the Board. Top

Q. What are the Governing Documents?
A. The "Governing Documents" for your association are the Articles of Incorporation, Bylaws, Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions (or Declaration of Condominium) plus any Rules and Regulations, Resolutions or guidelines that have been established by your association. Top

Q. Where can I get a copy of the Governing Documents?
A. You should have received a full copy at, or prior to, closing on your home. If you need another set, it is available through your association and/or its managing agent. Your Governing Documents are recorded instruments so they are also available through the County in which your Association is located. Top

Q. What is a deed restriction and why do I have to comply?
A. It is part of the Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions (or Declaration of Condominium) that you agreed to when you bought your home. Through this document, you agreed to certain standards of maintenance, upkeep and behavior in order to make the community as attractive as possible for yourself and your neighbors, and to maintain or enhance your property values. When you purchase a home in a deed-restricted community you automatically agree to comply with the restrictions then in place or that are properly established. Top

Q. Why do I have to get the Association's permission for home improvement?
A. This better ensures that your intended improvement meets your community's standards as set forth in the Governing Documents and avoids the problems that arise from the construction of improvements and the use of colors or styles that conflict with others in your neighborhood. Top

Q. What do the Association fees cover?
A. Your Association's fees or "assessments" pay for the maintenance, repair and administration of the common areas and facilities of the Association. These can include pools, tennis courts, recreational facilities, street lights, greenbelts and, in the case of condominium associations, the actual physical structure of the building or buildings. Top

Q. What is the "common area"?
A. It is the land for the use and enjoyment of the members of the Association. This includes facilities like pools and playgrounds in single-family communities and hallways, exercise facilities and building structures in condominium. Top

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
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